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Raspberries

We recommend waiting until leaves have dropped before planting raspberries. November and December are ideal times but good establishment can be achieved until early spring.

Later planting can succeed but we cannot take responsibility for planting performance after March.

Click here to see our full range of raspberry canes.

Dig a trench 45cm (18in) wide and 20cm (8in) deep and cover the base with a good layer of compost. Dig this into the base of the trench and then plant the canes allowing 45cm between each cane. Replace the soil and gently firm. Feed the soil with a handful of Gromore around each cane. Finally cut the canes back to around 15cm (6in) from the ground to encourage strong new growth.

Knock in sturdy posts at the end of each row and stretch heavy-gauge wires between the posts at around 70cm, 1.2m and 1.7m (28in, 48in and 68in) above ground. Tie the canes to the wires with soft twine.

Water the newly planted canes during the first season if the weather is dry. In subsequent years watering when the fruits are swelling may be needed if the soil is not already moist. Pruning of summer varieties of raspberries should take place after the last fruit has been picked. Cut down all the dark brown canes that have born fruit that summer, retaining the best 6 new canes for next year’s crop. All canes of Autumn varieties should be cut back in February. Tie new canes to the wires as they grow.

For maximum crops feed each year in March with a general purpose feed. To retain moisture at the roots, add a mulch layer around the base of the canes each year. Don’t use the hoe to keep weeds under control, as this will physically damage the surface roots.

Allow the fruits to turn full colour before gently pulling away from the stem. Pick every day and store in the fridge until you have enough for a meal. If you have more than you can eat, raspberries freeze well and once thawed retain their form, colour and taste.

All our stock is certified under the PHPS scheme and from virus tested material.

 

DOUBLE CROPPING AUTUMN RASPBERRIES.

This is not a new technique but it is one that has more merit than previously thought. ‘Gardening Which’ in a recent trial have tested the main cultivars and proved that using the double crop technique can be very productive.

Joan J and Autumn Treasure produced a larger crop overall and produced a much longer cropping period without extra care or depleting the plants’ energy.

The technique involves leaving all the canes uncut over winter - this will produce an early crop in the following summer.

Once these canes have fruited cut them down to the ground.

This will leave all the fresh current season’s green canes still standing to fruit in the Autumn as usual.


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